Employment Law

What impact will the EU referendum result have on UK employment law?

The EU referendum vote on the 23 rd June 2016 is undoubtedly a historic landmark in British political history.  Whether you were in the ‘remain’ camp or the ‘Brexit’ camp, the country has made its decision.   The next few...

Travel to work ruling: What's it all about and who does it affect?

Last week the European Court of Justice made a ruling that those employing workers who had to travel to get to or from their first or last appointment of the day were required to count time spent travelling as ‘working time’ and as part of their...

The National Living Wage: What's it all about?

The idea behind the National Living Wage is to provide over 25 year olds with a wage that is high enough for workers to have a ‘normal standard of living’. That means being able to afford everyday things like food, transport and paying bills. ...

Employment Tribunal fees are here to stay... for now!

On the 26 th August 2015, the Court of Appeal dismissed the challenge brought by Unison against the introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunals and the Employment Appeal Tribunal; R (Unison) v Lord Chancellor and another [2015]. Unison argued that the...

National Minimum Wage: Underpayment Penalty

First proposed on the 15 th January 2014, today (26 th May 2015) the Government has now increased the maximum financial penalty for underpayment of the national minimum wage from £5,000 to £20,000 per worker. The Government, via HMRC and BIS,...

Zero Hours Contracts: Exclusivity Clauses Update

The much amended and supplemented Employment Rights Act 1996, the cornerstone for UK employment legislation, has grown a bit more with the introduction of Sections 27A and 27B on 26th May 2015 which bring into effect the result of the consultation on...

Employment Tribunal Fees & Claims: What the Political Parties Say

With the general election on the horizon, we thought it may be interesting to read about what the parties say about the Employment Tribunal system. Employment Tribunal fees were introduced in July 2013. The fees mean that employees who want to pursue a...

The EAT finds linking a bonus entitlement to sickness absence was disability discrimination

Employers looking to retain staff often operate management incentives; the most commonly offered incentives are bonus schemes. The majority of employers operate discretionary schemes dependent on a range of factors; individual or company financial...

Sports Direct faces multi million pound claim from zero hours contract workers

Zero hours contracts have been at the source of much debate recently. They could be described as the Marmite of the employment world! Loved for their flexibility, hated for their irregularity. The debate continues, fuelled by the recent news that Sports...

The Fit for Work Service

Until the 6 th April last year, under the Statutory Sick Pay Percentage Threshold Scheme, employers were able to claim a refund from HMRC  where the Statutory Sick Pay paid in that month exceeded 13% of their monthly national insurance...

Goughs First HR Forum: A successful and interactive discussion on the Shared Parental Leave regime

The Goughs HR Forum held its first meeting on Thursday last week at the Angel Hotel in Chippenham . The event was well attended and saw guest speaker, Richard Owen-Thomas, a leading barrister from 3 Paper Buildings Chambers, explaining some of the...

Disqualification by Association

Under the Childcare Act 2006 and the Childcare Disqualification Regulations 2009 there is now an additional onus on schools to ask staff who work with children up to the age of 8 to disclose information with regard to a person who lives or works in the same...