Will Writing Solicitors

Making sure your assets are managed properly when you’re gone

Making a Will in the UK

Making a Will is an essential part of life as it ensures that when you die, your estate, shares, savings and any personal possessions, are dealt with according to your wishes. If you were to pass away without writing a Will (Intestacy), usually, the only people who would inherit anything would be your married or civil partner, and other next of kin. There are variations depending on the value of the estate and whether it is worth more or less than £270k.

Our Will writing specialists are all based in the UK and have worked with thousands of clients to ensure their families are provided for, and that their wishes are acted upon as planned. Contact our team of Will writing solicitors for expert help and support for creating your Will. 

Key Contact

Emma Taylor

Partner & Head of Private Client

Why should you make a Will?

By making a Will, you can ensure your property and affairs are dealt with in accordance with your wishes, and that any specific intentions you have for your home, money or possessions are carried through efficiently after your death and that your loved ones are provided for in a tax-efficient way.

So whether you’re writing a new Will, or updating your current one, we’ll work with you to tailor our service to best meet your needs.

Writing a Will

The cost of Will writing

Goughs Solicitors provides a diverse selection of Will writing services, with all Wills being personalised and guided by experienced lawyers. We’ve laid out all the options available to you, along with their unique features, so you can make an informed decision about which Will best meets your needs.

Considering the extent of your estate and the intricacy of your personal circumstances, we can suggest the ideal package tailored to your needs. The pricing is determined by the level of expertise of the solicitor, associate, or partner handling your Will:

Will writing services start from £350 + VAT

Understanding the different types of Wills

Understanding the different types of will can be complicated, which is why we have listed out the 5 most common ones below. So whether you are drafting your own will, or seeking to understand a loved one’s estate plan, we have everything you need below.

Asset Protection Trust Wills

An Asset Protection Trust, otherwise known as a Family Protection Trust, is used to protect specific assets (like a family home) from circumstances like second marriage succession, care home fees or creditors. Your Will can determine that your half of the asset, like the family home, passes into the Trust on your death. On the death, or remarriage, of the remaining spouse, your half of the asset is transferred (or the sale proceeds paid) to the named beneficiaries of the Will.

Mirror Will

Mirror Wills are designed for couples who have the same wishes. Two documents are produced, one for each person, but each Will ‘mirrors’ the other. When one spouse dies, the whole estate is passed to the surviving spouse, and when they die the estate is distributed according to what is laid out in the Will. It’s important to be aware that with a mirror Will there is no guarantee your estate Will be passed on to your loved ones if you die before your spouse and they change their Will.

Single Will

Single Wills are usually used by people who are not in a relationship or are divorced, but can also be used in circumstances when your wishes differ from your spouse/if your spouse already has a Will. Single Wills are especially useful if you’re married but have children from a previous relationship, as you can divide your estate between your spouse and your children.

Discretionary Trust Will

Discretionary trusts are used to leave your estate (or part of it) to a trust created in your Will. You can choose people to manage the trust, known as trustees, and name the people who are beneficiaries of the trust. The trustees then have total discretion over what, how and when your beneficiaries receive the contents of the trust.

Property Trust Will

Property trust Wills tend to be used by divorced couples who have remarried, to prevent assets passing to children of their partner’s new spouse if they remarry after their death. A property trust Will ensures your assets are protected and passed to the people you have specified in your Will

Not sure what Will you need?

Identifying which Will is best suited for your needs will be fundamental to ensure that all of the assets you wish to leave are handled accordingly. If you are still unsure about which Will you nee or if you have any questions about writing your Will, please get in touch with us. We will be more than happy to talk to you about all your options.

Understanding the different types of Wills

Identifying which Will is best suited for your needs Will be fundamental to ensure that all of the assets you wish to leave are handled accordingly.

Single Will

Single Wills are usually used by people who are not in a relationship or are divorced, but can also be used in circumstances when your wishes differ from your spouse/if your spouse already has a Will. Single Wills are especially useful if you’re married but have children from a previous relationship, as you can divide your estate between your spouse and your children.

Mirror Will

Single Wills are usually used by people who are not in a relationship or are divorced, but can also be used in circumstances when your wishes differ from your spouse/if your spouse already has a Will. Single Wills are especially useful if you’re married but have children from a previous relationship, as you can divide your estate between your spouse and your children.

Discretionary Trust Will

Discretionary trusts are used to leave your estate (or part of it) to a trust created in your Will. You can choose people to manage the trust, known as trustees, and name the people who are beneficiaries of the trust. The trustees then have total discretion over what, how and when your beneficiaries receive the contents of the trust.

Property Trust Will

Property trust Wills tend to be used by divorced couples who have remarried, to prevent assets passing to children of their partner’s new spouse if they remarry after their death. A property trust Will ensures your assets are protected and passed to the people you have specified in your Will.

Asset Protection Trust Wills

An Asset Protection Trust, otherwise known as a Family Protection Trust, is used to protect specific assets (like a family home) from circumstances like second marriage succession, care home fees or creditors. Your Will can determine that your half of the asset, like the family home, passes into the Trust on your death. On the death, or remarriage, of the remaining spouse, your half of the asset is transferred (or the sale proceeds paid) to the named beneficiaries of the Will.

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Need help writing your Will?

At Goughs our mission is to provide excellent, trusted and truly personal legal services. How we do this is simple – we are committed to our clients, our people and our communities.

If you need help writing your Will then get in touch with one of our expert team and we assist you.

Amending a Will

It’s recommended to review your Will every 5 years or after any major life changes have occurred, such as a divorce/separation, marriage, adopting or birthing a child, a house move or similar. If you have experienced any major life changes, it’s advised to look at making a new Will. 

However, once your Will has been signed off, you Will only be able to change your Will by an official adjustment called a codicil, which is officiated the same as a Will by witnesses.

If you need to amend a Will, our team can support you through the steps, by your side every step of the way.

Couple amending a Will

Don't risk your family's inheritance

Your local Will writers since 1882

Popular questions about making a Will

If you don’t make a Will, the law will divide your estate according to what is known as the rules of intestacy. These rules are very rigid and may not reflect what you’d like to happen to your wealth, or what is most tax-efficient.

The more information on the rules of intestacy, please click here.

You can legally write your own will but the general condition is to have 2 independent adult witnesses present. However it is advised to speak to a professional either before, during or after to ensure your assets are dealt with in the way you wish, and that the document has been drawn up properly. Writing your own Will is called a DIY Will. You can learn more about DIY Wills here.

A will does not have to be drawn up by a solicitor by law and can technically be written by you. We would strongly advise that you do use a solicitor to ensure that your will making process is handled in a professional and legal manner.

You cannot explicitly buy a will or will-making kit from a post office but most UK postal offices will provide a will-writing template to help you if you decide to write your own without a solicitor.

Depending on the branch, some banks will offer will-writing services but these can be costly. You may choose to get in touch with your branch to discover more about their will-writing service if they offer this.

When the executor or administrator is required to present a death certificate, they should provide a duplicate to the applicable banks. Subsequently, the banks will temporarily suspend the accounts until the Grant of Probate is obtained. It is crucial to promptly inform all relevant financial institutions following a death.

In the event that an individual passes away without a legally recognised Will, it is the responsibility of the administrator to notify the bank about the death. You will need to provide a death certificate, and as a result, the bank will suspend the account until the letters of administration are acquired, granting the designated person the legal right to manage the bank account.

This executor specified in the will can do this. Alternatively, if no executor has been designated, the administrator (primary beneficiary) assumes the responsibility. They will initiate the process by contacting the relevant bank, providing appropriate evidence of the death. Generally, the death certificate is recognised as valid proof in such cases.

Our clients rate us as excellent

Legal 500

Client orientated; they ensure the client is well informed with easy to read documents.

L C, Devizes

Our Wills were dealt with efficiently, we have already recommended your firm to our daughter and husband. Absolutely brilliant – thank you.

Sue Greenman

Everything was completed professionally and within my tight time scales. I would like to say thank you and would definitely go back to Goughs should I need help in the future.

Legal 500

Goughs gives outstanding customer satisfaction. They are very approachable, reliable, courteous and informed. I would recommend Goughs to anyone.

R F, Melksham

Great service, professional, great communication and handled what was a very sensitive situation with care and compassion.

W D, Calne

Professional, helpful & knowledgeable service. Giving very clear advice in a way I could understand. Thank you.

Meet the Private Client team

Trainee Solicitor

Partner (TEP)

Associate (FCILEx)

Solicitor

Solicitor

Solicitor

Partner & Head of Private Client

Trainee Solicitor

Solicitor

Trainee Solicitor

Solicitor

Trainee Solicitor

Paralegal

Trainee Solicitor

Paralegal

Solicitor

Associate (FILCEx)

Associate Solicitor

Associate (FCILEx)

Associate Solicitor

Partner (TEP)

Partner & Head of Private Wealth

Partner & Head of Private Client

Senior Associate (FCILEx)

Why choose Goughs?

Local since 1882, with an excellent reputation

First-class, effective service

Largest solicitors in Wiltshire

Seven offices throughout the county

Nationally accredited law firm

Recognised by Legal 500 and Chambers & Partners

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Our Offices

The Strand, Calne
Wiltshire, SN11 0JU
01249 812086

Chippenham
Mill House, 1 New Road
Chippenham, Wiltshire
SN15 1EJ
01249 444499

Corsham
23 Pickwick Road, Corsham,
Wiltshire, SN13 9BH
01249 712193

Devizes
Ramsbury House
30 Market Place, Devizes
Wiltshire, SN10 1JG
01380 726913

Melksham
5 Bath Road, Melksham
Wiltshire, SN12 6LN
01225 703036

Trowbridge
2 Fore Street, Trowbridge
Wiltshire, BA14 8HX
01225 762683

Greenways
Unit 5
Greenways Business Park
Bellinger Close
Chippenham
SN15 1BN
01249 475880

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